Opening Reception Thursday January 2, 2020 5-7pm

Enjoy the January exhibit Rough Around the Edges by Stephanie Cox and Anna Widman; textural contrast explored by two area artists.  Widman transfers ocean debris lines to unstretched canvas  The result is an extremely textural and rough piece mixed with elements of sheen and glow. Widman “strives to find a way to communicate and interpret the subliminal mix of awe and peace found in nature.” While Cox “creates high relief organic textured paintings organized in structured patterns and shapes influenced by city scenes, Alaskan terrain, geometric designs and more” often using wall-joint compound applied on sheetrock with putty knives. 


Anna Widman

As an artist in the midst of a chaotic world I strive to find a way to communicate and interpret the subliminal mix of awe and peace found in nature. Kinesthetic in my work, I bring un-stretched canvas outdoors. Then transferring earth, mostly debris lines left by the ocean tide, to that surface I create the base for the piece. This is an effort to literally take a piece of time from the earth. I take this captured bit of time to the studio and layer the earth with metallic and neutral colors in a variety of medias and applications. The result is an extremely textural and rough piece mixed with elements of sheen and glow. Evolving with the ever-changing world of painting, I morph as an artist to encompass a realm of experimental and non-brush techniques. 

The crux of my work deals with temporality, ephemerality, and the human body as well as multiple aspects of the sublime. A continuation of my experiments reflects our give and take relationship with the land and its context in history. Additionally, I examine the body and its limitations. I gain insight from modern theorists and contemporary artists who relate to my work. Further investigations involve non-masculine aspects of art making and finding my place between sculpture and painting. 


Stephanie Cox

My interest in non-objective textured paintings began a few years ago after many remodeling jobs accompanying my husband, Tyson. While working with wall-joint compound applied on sheetrock with putty knives I began to experiment and conjure ideas of creating abstract patterns, textures, and shapes. Relief paintings and sculptures have always fascinated me. I create high relief organic textured paintings organized in structured patterns and shapes influenced by city scenes, Alaskan terrain, geometric designs and more. The juxtaposition of the natural textures and the geometric pattern designs intrigues me. Colors remain a consistent driving force in my creative process. Earthy browns, grey- greens, and golden yellow tones found in the Eastern Oregon plains contrast greatly from Alaska’s lush greens and crystal blues.

The multitude of local potters, painters, sculptors, and photographers in the community also inspire me. I thrive on the environmental surroundings of Alaska. From salmon and halibut to wildflowers and mountain ranges to the Northern Lights, I interpret and represent the colors, textures, and feels of the Alaskan environment. I use the local feel to contrast and soften the city scenes. The idea of organic versus industrialized remains a central theme in many of the pieces.

My high school students also inspire and influence my artwork.
Their support for and even questions about my creative process prod me to reflect intently about how and why I create the pieces I do. My students help elaborate my ideas and morph them in ways only high school students could. I enjoy the creative energy found in the classroom and like working along side my students.